Happiness Now | 3 Tips for Reducing Workplace Burnout 

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At the beginning of the year, most of us vow to produce some variety of accomplishments over the next 12 months. Employees want to get that promotion, make more money, or to create their best work. Not only can that be stressful, but your workplace culture might be competitive or hyper-focused on results, sales, etc. By the end of the first quarter, you might notice that your office seemed a bit burned out and the momentum has slowed. 

So what can you do to reduce burnout before it takes a toll on your employees? Read 3 of the easiest ways to do it:

 

1) Have breaks that can re-focus them

When employees take breaks nowadays, they’ll usually sit alone somewhere and be on their phone for 15 minutes. Instead, encourage your employees to do something different like: 

  • take a walk outside and stretch their legs
  • socialize and hold off on talking about work
  • catch up on some reading 
  • listen to a TED talk that you might reccommend 
Does your team have some stressful deadlines coming up? Research has also shown that meditation can reduce anxiety, which would be extremely helpful at work. You can encourage employees to give meditation a try by purchasing access to a meditation app they can listen to while on break.

Some apps to check out: HeadspaceSimple Habit

 

2) Allow schedule flexibility

Having a non-traditional work schedule can be a blessing for your employees as it can lead to higher job satisfaction levels and less stress. Though day-to-day work might seem redundant, the lives of your employees are continually progressing. There might be significant changes and stressors taking priority in their lives like a new baby, family obligations, etc. So if making it to the kids’ soccer game at 5 pm is a priority, why not let them leave early? Start small and see how it impacts the mood and motivation of your employees.

Related Post: 3 Ways to Engage and Retain Employees in 2018

 

3) Hesitate on the urge to overload work

As a manager in any capacity, there’s always some temptation to give your teams more work because you think they can handle it. In many cases, they might not feel empowered to decline to more work because of the workplace culture or your authority.  Before you give into temptation, think about if that work can wait. If you can manage deadlines without overloading your teams, you can lead by example, so they don’t feel pressured to pile on more responsibilities and commit to long work weeks.

Recommended shareHow to Tell Your Boss You Have Too Much Work

 


 

Are you determined to structure your team towards a healthy work-life balance for less burnout, low turnover, and boosted productivity? At DH, we offer coachsulting for teams so they can navigate their business goals with a culture that supports them, both professionally and personally:

 

Learn more about DH Coach|sulting here

 

 

About the Author

Briana Krueger

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